Search Results for "UNC Community Campus Partnership"

Public-Private Partnerships: Universities & Private Developers

first-ward-park-rendering-370pxUniversity enrollments are at an historic high and an increased student population requires that universities grow in other areas as well, such as housing and facilities. In recent years, universities have been partnering with private developers to advise and help them manage this growth. Previous posts on this blog have highlighted the role that higher education can play in economic development and in downtown revitalization.

There are many benefits to a university in seeking a private partner as they expand and redevelop their facilities. Reduced budgets, hiring freezes, and capital cutbacks mean many university departments are already working at capacity. Hiring a private developer to take on the work of managing major redevelopment greatly reduces the pressure on campus staff and brings in development expertise that the in-house staff may not have. The result of that expertise can mean reduced construction costs, expedited timelines, and better buildings that capitalize on the latest academic trends.

The move to using private developers to create facilities also has the added benefit of providing access to new sources of private funding unavailable to universities, and access and expertise in using funding sources such as government grants, loans, and tax credits, that can significantly reduce the cost burden on the public partner. Private development partnerships can even provide a university the option to complete the project through off-sheet financing if their current debt structure does not necessarily allow for the undertaking of new, costly projects, thus allowing them to still meet the needs of their students despite concerns of debt capacity. Read More…

Partnership Potential Between Water Utilities and Their Non-Residential Customers

What happens if your largest water customer moves out of town? What if you suddenly need to reduce usage drastically in your service area due to an emergency – which of your customers should you call first? How has water use changed over time for your ten largest customers, and what does that mean for your bottom line? What other changes have happened with your commercial customers, and are those changes systemic or temporary? Understanding how a utility’s non-residential customers use water can help answer these questions and can provide critical information to utility managers in assessing their water resources and financial stability into the future.

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UNC Partnerships with Tier I Counties (Part VI): Health Care Careers in Eastern, NC

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

As described in parts I, II, III, IV and V of this series, UNC Chapel Hill faculty, staff and students are engaged in creative partnerships with Tier I counties across North Carolina. This post is the sixth in a series highlighting community and economic development partnerships between Tier I counties and UNC. The purpose of this series is to provide examples of projects, for potential or future community partners, in which UNC resources have been available to assist Tier I counties.

Each semester, faculty in the UNC Department of City and Regional Planning (DCRP) offer workshop courses for graduate students. Workshops involve partnerships between groups of graduate students and outside entities with an interest in a relevant planning topic (including economic and community development). Teams of graduate students provide applied research and consulting services to partners on specific questions of local or regional significance. Read More…

UNC Partnerships with Tier I Counties (Part V): Mitigating health risks in homes

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

As described in parts I, II,  III, and IV of this series, UNC Chapel Hill faculty, staff and students are engaged in creative partnerships with Tier I counties across North Carolina. This post is the fourth in a series highlighting community and economic development partnerships between Tier I counties and UNC. The purpose of this series is to provide examples of projects, for potential or future community partners, in which UNC resources have been available to assist Tier I counties.

The UNC Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility (CEHS) offers “healthy homes” programming across North Carolina. Healthy Homes involves working with underserved communities, especially those that are susceptible to environmental health hazards in homes. The work is led by the Center’s Community Outreach and Engagement Core. Read More…

Creating a Community Assessment Directory: Caswell County United Way

Amanda Stafford is a UNC-Chapel Hill graduate student pursuing a master’s degree in Public Administration. She is currently working as a Community-Campus Partnership Intern with the United Way of Caswell County.

Over the past four months, the Community-Campus Partnership (CCP) and the United Way of Caswell County (UWCC) have been working together to compile a comprehensive community assessment directory for Caswell County. The project is driven by the need, expressed by local officials, to have better access to community data and indicators, across local government agencies, nonprofits etc.

The comprehensive community assessment in Caswell County will benefit local leaders by:

  • Increasing accessibility of data and information on trends for grant applications and community decision making
  • Reducing duplication of efforts when gathering community information
  • Connecting local government, nonprofit and community agencies in Caswell County

Read More…

UNC Partnerships with Tier I Counties (Part IV)

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

As described in parts I, II & III of this series, UNC Chapel Hill faculty, staff and students are engaged in creative partnerships with Tier I counties across North Carolina. This post is the fourth in a series highlighting community and economic development partnerships between Tier I counties and UNC. The purpose of this series is to provide examples of projects, for potential or future community partners, in which UNC resources have been available to assist Tier I counties.

The Community Development Law (CDL) Clinic at the UNC School of Law provides corporate and transactional counsel to North Carolina nonprofit community development organizations. The CDL Clinic aims to help students develop skills in corporate and transactional law while serving the legal needs of under-resourced North Carolina communities.

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UNC Partnerships with Tier I Counties (Part III)

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

As described in parts I & II of this series, UNC Chapel Hill faculty, staff and students are engaged in creative partnerships with Tier I counties across North Carolina. This post is the third in a series that will highlight community and economic development partnerships between Tier I counties and UNC. The purpose of this series is to provide examples of projects, for potential or future community partners, in which UNC resources have been available to assist Tier I counties.

Faculty members from the UNC School of Education (SOE) have worked recently with school system leaders in Caswell County on a variety of education-related community development projects.

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UNC Partnerships with Tier I counties (part II)

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

As described in Part I of this series, UNC Chapel Hill faculty, staff and students are engaged in creative partnerships with Tier I counties across North Carolina. This post is the second in a series that will highlight community and economic development partnerships between Tier I counties and UNC. The purpose of this series is to provide examples of projects, for potential or future community partners, in which UNC resources have been available to assist Tier I counties.

The Kenan Institute’s (KI) Eastern North Carolina Initiative works with community partners in eastern NC on a variety of economic development projects.

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UNC partnerships with Tier I counties (part I)

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

Annually, the North Carolina Department of Commerce analyzes the economic well-being of the state’s 100 counties and assigns each to a designation. The 40 most economically distressed counties are designated as Tier 1, the next 40 as Tier 2 and the 20 least economically distressed as Tier 3 (map here for 2012 rankings). In general, Tier I counties tend to have limited capacity for carrying out community and economic development and therefore have a greater need for resources and strategic partnerships.

UNC Chapel Hill faculty, staff and students (and associated centers, institutes, schools, etc) are engaged in creative partnerships with Tier I counties across North Carolina. This post is the first in a series that will highlight community and economic development partnerships between Tier I counties and UNC. The purpose of this series is to provide examples of projects, for potential or future community partners, in which UNC resources have been available to assist Tier I counties. Read More…

Community-Campus Partnership Update: Caswell County

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

Since 2009, UNC has been supporting leaders in Caswell County on a variety of community and economic development projects. Through that work, public school teachers have emerged as a possible talent pool for future civic leadership. On Wednesday, Dec 14th, CCP and our partners at the Danville Regional Foundation (DRF) co-sponsored a leadership workshop for teachers and other community leaders in Caswell County. The purpose of the meeting was threefold: (1) to describe University resources available to support leaders in Caswell County, (2) to describe the DRF “Make It Happen” grant program, which provides up to $10,000 small grants to small, visible, community-based projects and (3) to begin developing collaborative projects that might qualify for DRF funding through “Make It Happen,” and generate new momentum around community priorities. The following is a summary of the issues and projects that emerged from conversation between the University, a regional foundation, and community leaders from Caswell County.

Community-Campus Partnerships: Marion and Valdese, NC

Marvin Hoffman is a faculty member at Appalachian State University.

Two years ago, Appalachian State University (ASU) joined a partnership with the Community-Campus Partnership (CCP) at UNC Chapel Hill to support small towns in North Carolina. The North Carolina Rural Center provided grant funding for faculty, students and staff from ASU, UNC-Chapel Hill and UNC-Pembroke to support the work of small town leaders attempting to carry out transformative local economic and community development projects. This post will review several of the major accomplishments from our campus’ partnerships with the City of Marion and the Town of Valdese.

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CCP Awards a Grant of $7,695 for Community Garden in Caswell County

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

CCP has awarded a $7,695 grant to Dr. Alice Ammerman, director of the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention at UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health and Marian Sadler, a graduate student in Public Health. The grant has been made in support of “Tradition with a Vision,” a project to build a community garden in Caswell County, North Carolina. Read More…

Kinston Promise Neighborhood Initiates Community Needs Assessment

Andrew Guinn is a graduate student in the UNC Department of City and Regional Planning and a CCP intern in Lenoir and Caswell Counties.

A lot has happened in the Kinston Promise Neighborhood since the CED Blog last checked in with them in August.  Notably, while the Kinston group did not receive federal dollars to fund its early-stage planning activities, the Promise Partners have agreed to push forward as a Promise Neighborhood.   Read More…

Community-Campus Partnership Provides $18,000 Grant for Prostate Cancer Ambassadors of Caswell County Project

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

The Community-Campus Partnership (CCP) has awarded a $18,000 grant to the Carolina Community Network to Reduce Health Disparities in support of the Prostate Cancer Ambassadors of Caswell County project. The project, an initiative of UNC Program on Ethnicity, Culture and Health Outcomes (ECHO) and headed by Dr. Anissa Vines, aims to address the significant prostate cancer burden in Caswell County, especially among African American males, though a combination of community outreach and scholarly research. Read More…

Community-Campus Partnership Provides $20,000 Grant for Education Program in Caswell County

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

The Community-Campus Partnership (CCP) has awarded a $20,000 grant to School of Education Professor Suzanne Gulledge and the Carolina ACES (Academic Curriculum Enrichment Students) project. The grant will help bring UNC-Chapel Hill student mentors and specialized education programming to N.L. Dillard Middle School in Yanceyville, N.C.

Professor Gulledge, ACES project director said, “I hope that that the presence of Carolina students will enhance the learning experience for Caswell County’s middle school students and that this will be an enriching experience for everyone involved.” Read More…

Community-Campus Partnership Provides $20,000 Grant for Workforce Development Data Project in Lenoir County

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

The Community-Campus Partnership (CCP) at UNC-Chapel Hill, a campus-wide initiative to forge effective partnerships with economically distressed communities in North Carolina, has awarded a $20,000 grant to Douglas Lauen, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Public Policy at UNC-Chapel Hill, to support workforce development policymaking in Lenoir County, North Carolina. Lauen will work with Lenoir County Schools and other partners to link databases between institutions; the project goal is to produce data analyses that will inform workforce development and education reform. Read More…

The Greater Kinston Credit Union: educating the community in financial literacy

Leah Elliott is a rising junior in UNC’s undergraduate departments of Political Science and Public Policy and a CCP intern working in Caswell and Lenoir Counties.

Every month, a group of approximately fifteen individuals enters the Greater Kinston Credit Union (GKCU) and heads to the second floor. On this day, the conference room will not be a workspace or meeting place for employees, it will be a classroom for students in the Family Literacy course. Read More…

CCP works with the Caswell County Partnership for Children on a Community Needs Assessment

Joy Jackson is a graduate student in UNC’s  Master of Public Administration program and a CCP intern working in Lenoir  and Caswell Counties.

This summer, CCP will be working with the Caswell County Partnership for Children to design and implement a community needs assessment.  The assessment aims to uncover the current needs of families who qualify for their Smart Start program, a public-private initiative that provides early education funding to all of the North Carolina’s 100 counties. Smart Start funds are used to improve the quality of child care, make child care more affordable and accessible, provide access to health services and offer family support.  Read More…

The Importance of Relationship-Building in Community Development

Joy Jackson is a Masters Student of Public Administration and a graduate student assistant working with the Community-Campus Partnership

Prior to coming to UNC, I worked for a community development financial intermediary in New York City that provided financial and technical assistance to local community development corporations (CDCs).  Having the opportunity to work with the Community Campus Partnership (CCP) during my first year as a graduate student in the School of Government has afforded me the opportunity to pursue, what is for me, a new type of community development – rural community development.

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Summer Internships – UNC Undergraduate and Graduate Students – Marketing, Communications and Public Relations

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community-Campus Partnership and Associate Director for the Community & Economic Development Program.

The Community-Campus Partnership (CCP) at the UNC School of Government is seeking two student interns (one graduate and one upper-class undergraduate) for the summer 2010 to work as a team on marketing, communications and public relations projects with community partners in Lenoir and/or Caswell County, North Carolina. These are paid, 12-week internships based off-campus in our partners’ communities that will begin on approximately May 15, 2009. Some work may be done from a central location in RTP/Chapel Hill but travel and/or relocation for the summer may be required. A travel stipend will be provided. Read More…

Kendra Cotton joins Community-Campus Partnership as Project Director

KDCotton (2)

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community-Campus Partnership and Associate Director for the Community & Economic Development Program.

Kendra Cotton has joined the School of Government as a Project Director with the Community-Campus Partnership (CCP). Kendra is not new to UNC Chapel Hill. She is a current PhD student in Political Science. For the last several years she has been serving as the Associate Director for the Center for the Study of the American South and the UNC Program on Public Life. Originally from Arkansas, Kendra earned her MPA from NC State and B.A. from the University of Oklahoma. As Project Director for CCP, Kendra will lead the program evaluation. She will also work with faculty, students and staff from across campus to develop research projects that align with community priorities in Caswell and Lenoir Counties. Welcome, Kendra.

Will Lambe authored the NC Rural Center report, Small Towns, Big Ideas, and he served as Director of the Community and Economic Development Program at the School of Government from 2009 to 2014.

Golden LEAF’s Community Assistance Initiative (CAI) in Lenior County: An Update

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community-Campus Partnership and the Associate Director for the Community & Economic Development Program.

Lenoir Community College #6658On Monday night, November 9, community leaders from across Lenoir County came together to hear feedback on project proposals that have been submitted to the Golden LEAF Foundation. Foundation President Dan Gerlach provided an overview of project proposals, which total $8.3 million. The Foundation will invest $2 million in projects selected by a committee of local leaders and approved by the Golden LEAF board. Read More…

Community Campus Connections

Kate Pearce is a graduate student assistant working in Caswell County.

Over the past couple of months I have attended a couple of presentations to various campus working groups on the Community Campus Partnership.  Through this “road show” I have met a number of faculty and staff interested in becoming involved in some capacity in Caswell County.  Below is a partial list of interested parties.  Stay tuned for more information on how UNC faculty are finding their niche in Caswell County.

  • Dr. Bill Rohe, Department of City and Regional Planning- considering structuring his spring downtown revitalization class on downtown Yanceyville
  • Dr. Suzanne Gulledge,  UNC School of Education, Middle Grades Education- interested in learning more about the needs of Caswell County educators
  • Dr. Dotty Holland, UNC Department of Anthropology- interested in local food systems in Caswell County
  • Dr. Mark Dorsin, Senior Attorney in the Center for Civil Rights

Part II: The Start Up and Co-Working Scene in North Carolina

HQ Raleigh

Part I of this three-part series covered the co-working concept and what additional resources business incubators can offer.  Now in part II, the CED blog will take a deep dive into three of North Carolina’s business incubators, specifically HQ Raleigh, Launch Chapel Hill, and American Underground in Durham.

HQ Raleigh

In 2012, HUB Raleigh opened on Hillsborough Street in a 4,700 SF space, and the response was overwhelming.  They rebranded to HQ Raleigh and moved to the warehouse district in 2014.  They now occupy over 48,000 SF in Raleigh including their new space, which occupies the top five stories of the Capital Club. When walking into HQ Raleigh, the quickly-expanding business incubator in downtown Raleigh, it is anything but your typical office environment.  With its long counter, expresso machines, refrigerators, and beer taps, it looks like a cafe or bar at first glance. There is a large open seating area with games such as ping pong in the back. Beside the stairs is an enormous sculpture by Jonathan Brilliant, comprised of of over 30,000 wooden coffee stir sticks woven in place and held together only by tension.  Read More…

Brewery Incubators On the Rise

unknown-2The CED Blog has previously covered the economic development power of breweries to revitalize downtown Main Streets. And the blog recently detailed the utility and potential of retail incubators in helping aspiring entrepreneurs launch a business and establish a physical store location. And now, something new is brewing that combines these strategies: the emergence of brewery incubators. Read More…

City of Greensboro’s SC2 Challenge Yields Six Innovative Comprehensive Economic Development Plans

SC2GreensboroThe City of Greensboro made history becoming the first city in the United States to award $1 million in a prize challenge for economic development. Joining a select group of cities to administer a prize challenge in collaboration with the federal government (White House Council on Strong Cities, Strong Communities, Economic Development Administration), the “Gate City” announced the winner of the competition’s second phase August 17, 2015 Read more and watch the news conference video.

A strategic economic development plan developed by a local team of educators and business professionals was awarded $500,000 for first place in phase two of the City of Greensboro’s Strong Cities, Strong Communities (SC2) Challenge prize competition. Their plan for a Global Opportunities Center was one of six to make the final round of consideration. Read More…

Pedestrian Tunnels: Connecting People with Communities Part II

http://www.bizjournals.com/triad/blog/2014/08/tunnel-vision-why-unc-greensboros-pedestrian.html
Pedestrian tunnel at UNCG

Although pedestrian tunnels are often a less visible and flashy form of crossings, they are still an important part of pedestrian safety. That said, tunnels can be exciting too! Tunnels are often out of the public’s eye and have the ability to exhibit creative freedom. Not only can a tunnel make an impact on a local community, but it can also achieve this impact in a subtle manner. Similar to a pedestrian bridge (check out this post on pedestrian bridges), before an organization can determine if a pedestrian tunnel should be installed, it needs to understand the purpose, cost, and funding, and analyze relevant examples. Read More…

DFI Case Study: Attracting Private Investment for the Redevelopment of a Downtown Parking Deck

Water-St-Deck_aerial_sizedThe City of Wilmington, North Carolina, hired the Development Finance Initiative (DFI) in 2013 to conduct a pre-development process for the Water Street Parking Deck. The parking deck is an aging public parking facility prominently located in the city’s historic downtown on the Cape Fear riverfront.

Wilmington is one of North Carolina’s largest and fastest growing cities and a popular tourist destination. Its downtown area is an economic and social hub for the region. With a nearly 300-block historic district, the area includes cobblestone streets with ancient trees and lovingly restored historic homes, restaurants, shops, music and art venues, hotels, a river walk, a college campus, and a convention center.

The Challenge

The two-story Water Street Parking Deck was constructed in the 1960s and sits on 1.2 acres along Water Street overlooking the Cape Fear River. Though it is nearing functional obsolescence, the parking deck serves as primary public parking for tourists and locals alike. Surrounded by vibrant retail and entertainment businesses, the parking deck is an eyesore.

City officials long believed that a parking structure alone was not the highest and best use for the high-profile location. They envisioned a future for the site that would spur additional private investment while respecting the historic fabric of the surrounding built environment.  Read More…

The Downtown School

PromiseSchool may still be out for summer, but the CED blog is taking another look at the role that education plays in community and economic development. As earlier posts on teacher housing developments, downtown community colleges, an, most recently, the repurposing of historic school buildings have examined, education can play a very important role in creating vibrant, thriving communities — places where people can live, work, play and learn.

In Winston-Salem, one can see those four ingredients all in action at The Downtown School, a public school serving students in kindergarten through eighth grade in the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools (WSFCS) district. Housed in a 1925 building that was formerly part of the City Market in downtown Winston-Salem, the school is an example of what it may look like for a public school to be at the heart of a downtown. Read More…

Redevelopment Case Studies of Victorian-Era Psychiatric Facilities

danvers4Earlier this month, a post on CED in NC provided an overview of the redevelopment of Victorian-era psychiatric facilities.  Many historic psychiatric institutions throughout the country have closed, leaving large, architecturally significant buildings on vast campuses behind. The redevelopment of these facilities generally requires public-private partnerships, non-traditional financing, and creative programming. To illustrate the variety of opportunities that cities and towns have pursued with former psychiatric facilities, here are three projects that have tackled these challenges in different ways.  Read More…

Leveraging anchor institutions: A new land bank model in Chapel Hill

Northside_announce_140AAcross the country, local governments are increasingly embracing land banking as a key strategy to catalyze and control the revitalization of their vacant and abandoned properties. As described in this post on the CED blog, North Carolina local governments can cobble together the statutory authority to operate a land bank, a power that in some states is explicitly granted to municipalities. A new land bank launched in Chapel Hill in recent weeks as part of the Northside Neighborhood Initiative demonstrates an innovative partnership model that might be replicated elsewhere in the state, especially in communities that host large anchor institutions.  Read More…

Hospital Employee Benefit Program as Neighborhood Revitalization Tool

b050913_HOMEHospital Employee Home Ownership Programs

Large institutions such as colleges and hospitals play important roles in our communities. In addition to their primary educational and medical functions, they are significant community partners and forces of neighborhood revitalization. Hospitals around the country are realizing that community and economic development efforts go hand-in-hand with their mission to improve the health and welfare of the community. Hospitals are developing innovative programs to encourage neighborhood revitalization and better outcomes for their patients, employees, and community.

This blog post will focus on two homeownership programs from out-of-state hospitals as examples for successful community development that could be emulated by hospitals and communities in North Carolina.  Lancaster General Health (LGH) in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Yale-New Haven Hospital (YNHH) in New Haven, Connecticut created homeownership assistance programs to help facilitate neighborhood revitalization in the city and neighborhoods surrounding their urban campuses.  Read More…

What @sog_ced is reading on the web: October 2014


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The following are articles and reports on the web that the Community and Economic Development Program at the UNC School of Government shared through social media over the past month. Follow us on twitter or facebook to receive regular updates.

North Carolina’s new Economic Development Partnership:

North Carolina’s new Economic Development Agency meets fundraising requirement and opens its doors: ‪http://bit.ly/Zrue2z 

North Carolina’s new public-private economic development agency to release names of private donors and staff salaries in an effort to be transparent. ‪http://bit.ly/1o9LntA 

Items of interest related to CED in North Carolina:

The ABCs of Economic Development in North Carolina – economic development acronyms like JDIG, IDF, and JMAC explained. bit.ly/1u1hD4d

Fascinating inside look at why company chose to locate in NC rather than India. bit.ly/1tkcRwU

Kannapolis-based NC Research Campus receives $15 million endowment: ‪http://bit.ly/1xCbNqG 

The City of Wilmington and New Hanover County work together on six economic development priorities: ‪http://bit.ly/1sv0M7j 

WRAL series on North Carolina economic development incentives compares company promises with Read More…

What @sog_ced is reading on the web: November 2013

CED_Icon_for_TwitterThe following are articles and reports on the web that the Community and Economic Development Program at the UNC School of Government shared through social media over the past month. Follow us on twitter or facebook to receive regular updates.

Cabarrus County NC bows out of economic development ‘incentives game’: bit.ly/19Zb6Kj

North Carolina has overhauled its rural economic development delivery system, prompting the Raleigh News & Observer to ask questions about the future of rural development in the state: bit.ly/1aVlDFB

Dr. Pat Mitchell, Assistant Secretary for Rural Economic Development at the North Carolina Department of Commerce, touts the department’s rural strategy during a visit to Stanly County: http://bit.ly/1aWUcNM

In response to reports of problems with public-private partnerships for economic development in other states, North Carolina’s economic development leaders were asked to explain how North Carolina’s proposed public-private partnership will be different:

  • The North Carolina Department of Commerce Secretary explains that the state’s proposed public-private partnership will follow government transparency laws: Read More…

What @sog_ced is reading on the web: August 2013

CED_Icon_for_TwitterThe following are articles and reports on the web that the Community and Economic Development Program at the UNC School of Government shared through social media over the past month. Follow us on twitter or facebook to receive regular updates.

Changes at the North Carolina Department of Commerce and the Rural Center have been scrutinized by the media over the past month:

  • SOG faculty member Tyler Mulligan describes the new legislation that will transform the way community and economic development is executed in North Carolina: bit.ly/16zKfkB
  • The Rural Center could continue as a leaner organization focused on business loans and leadership training, with other functions taken over by the NC Department of Commerce: bit.ly/155ECJF
  • Article describes views of Secretary of Commerce on the establishment of a public-private partnership with Read More…

Promise Neighborhood Project, Kinston, NC

TheresaKinston Promise is a comprehensive approach to educating children and strengthening families in the town of Kinston, a mid-size community in eastern North Carolina. An organization, Kinston Promise Neighborhood, Inc., works through existing community-based programs to create a continuum of “cradle-through-college” solutions to improve the academic and developmental outcomes for children at all stages of growth: early learning, elementary school, middle school, high school, and college.

Once a vibrant community, the East Kinston neighborhood was devastated by inland flooding from Hurricane Floyd in 1999.  Many residents in the area were displaced when their homes were destroyed and the county was forced to purchase a large amount of condemned property.  East Kinston today has become known for high crime rates, public housing, food deserts, and low-performing schools.  The city of Kinston has invested significant time and resources in improving the Martin Luther King, Jr. corridor which passes through the East Kinston community; however, city initiatives have focused primarily on attracting new development and private investment in the area.  The vision of Kinston Promise Neighborhood, Inc. is to provide a comprehensive network of resources so that all children growing up in the East Kinston Promise Neighborhood will have access to effective schools and strong systems of family and community support that will prepare them to attain an excellent education and successfully transition to college and career.        Read More…

Economic Development through Higher Education Downtown

Bulldogs, Quakers, Titans, Lions, Spartans, Panthers, a Phoenix, even Belles. Guilford County is home to a menagerie of mascots representing various institutions of higher education, but only one, the aptly named Phoenix belonging to Elon University, has a physical presence in downtown Greensboro. When Elon University School of Law moved into the former public downtown library building in 2006, the city center saw an influx of 311 law students, 27 faculty members, and countless other visitors to the school. A critical mass of students can act as a driver for economic development in downtowns, injecting vibrancy into otherwise sparsely populated streets, patronizing retail and service businesses, and stimulating development in adjacent areas. Read More…

Analyzing Relationships for Program Assessment

Kendra Cotton is a project director with the Community-Campus Partnership.

Understanding existing professional and social relationships and their structures is vital to maximizing communication, nurturing supportive relationships and building efficiencies among collaborators. Social Network Analysis (SNA) is a multidisciplinary research method that is increasingly being used to uncover relationships among individuals and groups in both personal and professional contexts. SNA is a useful tool for evaluating programs in which relationships are important for outcomes. It allows evaluators to identify what the network is, how it operates, and how it affects program outcomes.

Through its project work with Caswell and Lenoir County organizations, the Community-Campus Partnership has cultivated an interesting collaborative network in each county with local government agencies, nonprofit entities and in some instances, private businesses. SNA is being used to assess, where possible, the strength of these relationships, but there is more work to be done in that regard. The sociograms included here provide informative visual illustrations of the partnership relationships to-date.

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Seed Capital Funding for CED Projects

Kendra Cotton is a Project Director with the Community-Campus Partnership Program.

Since December, School of Government faculty member Tyler Mulligan has penned a blog series (Posts: I, II, III, IV, V) that discusses the benefits of “asset-based development” for economically distressed communities. The series highlights approaches described in a School of Government web guide on asset-building tactics for individuals and communities on the economic margin. This week, the NC Community Development Initiative announced that its Innovation Fund is now accepting grant applications from nonprofit organizations to “test and implement effective sustainable approaches that create wealth and economic prosperity in persistently poor communities in North Carolina.” Given the community development priorities (job creation, green economy, leadership development, and/or sustainable development) that the fund supports, the asset-building series and web guide are just a few of the many helpful resources featured in this blog that communities can turn to during the application process. Read More…

Considering an intern to support your local organization?

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

A local economic development non-profit is considering an internship program to help support several high priority projects. The organization experimented with an internship program a few summers ago, but had trouble attracting high quality applicants, despite being located within driving distance of a university campus and a community college. Questions being contemplated include how to structure an internship to get maximum value for the organization; how to make the internship attractive to top quality students; and how to market the opportunity so that top quality applicants are aware of the organization’s internship.

The following are several tips for local organizations that are considering an internship program. These tips are drawn from our program’s experience shaping and managing a variety of CED internships across North Carolina.

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DPI Report Brings Mixed-Results for CCP Communities

Kendra Cotton is a project director with the Community-Campus Partnership.

Last week, the NC Department of Public Instruction released 2010-2011 annual report data on school dropout events and rates, bringing mixed results for Caswell and Lenoir Counties.

Caswell County experienced a slight increase—2.8 percent—in its dropout rate, reporting that 37 students dropped out in 2010-11, up from 36 during the 2009-10 school term. This number does, however, represent a marked 57.9 percent decrease from a 2006-07 high of 88 students. Still, as outlined by Dr. Judith Meece’s work in the area, “…the loss of nearly 40 students within one academic year is significant for a small, rural community with finite state and federal subsidies to assist these youth.” Read More…

Assistance Available for Public Health Projects

Kendra Cotton is a project director with the Community-Campus Partnership.

The Community-Campus Partnership was recently made aware of an opportunity that may be of interest to local agencies or community-based organizations working on public-health related issues.  The Department of Health Behavior and Health Education at the UNC Gillings School of Global Health (SPH) is looking for participatory public health projects as part of the culminating field experience for the Master of Public Health (MPH) program, Capstone. Over the course of 2 semesters (8 months), teams of 4-6 students work to produce a set of products or deliverables for a local agency, community-based organization, or other group working on public health-related issues. Read More…

“Big Rocks” in the Chapel Hill Comprehensive Planning Process

Scott Sherrill is a UNC-Chapel Hill graduate student pursuing a master’s degree in Public Administration. He is currently working as a Community-Campus Partnership Intern.

At the first reporting out session of the Chapel Hill 2020 theme groups, UNC School of Government faculty member Margaret Henderson suggested a “big rock” metaphor that has stuck with the theme groups. Margaret had a glass jar half filled with sand sitting in the middle of a table surrounded by rocks of a variety of sizes, shapes, and colors. In order to fit all of the rocks into the glass jar, a volunteer had to empty out the sand, and then place all of the big rocks in before she could fill in the rest of the jar with sand. In Margaret’s metaphor, the glass jar was time, into which all of the issues, or rocks, had to fit in the course of the planning process. The primary point is that identifying and including the important topics is necessary to avoid becoming lost in smaller issues and never addressing the larger ones. Read More…

Cultivating Leadership in Caswell County

Kendra Cotton is the project director for the Community-Campus Partnership.

UNC’s Community-Campus Partnership (CCP), the Danville Regional Foundation (DRF) and the Town of Yanceyville have a shared interest in developing leadership in Caswell County. Through several recent projects, CCP has identified teachers in public schools as a possible talent pool for future civic leadership.  As such, CCP reached out to the Danville Regional Foundation given its commitment to Caswell County’s citizenry. Read More…

Addressing the Challenges of Outreach and Reporting in the Chapel Hill 2020 Comprehensive Planning Process

Andrew Guinn is a PhD student in the Department of City and Regional Planning at UNC and works in Chapel Hill for the Community-Campus Partnership.

The Chapel Hill 2020 Comprehensive Planning Process is now well under way.  One of the most important – and most ambitious – goals of this process is to follow a model of participatory democracy, that is, to maximize community participation in creating the new Comprehensive Plan.  Towards this end, the Town of Chapel Hill set a target of touching 10,000 people through Chapel Hill 2020.  Outreach and reporting, then, will be critical to the success of the Town’s comprehensive planning efforts. Read More…

Governor’s Small Town Competitiveness Forum #3 — Haywood County

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

The third of three Governor’s forums on Small Town Competitiveness was held at Haywood Community College on October 6. As mentioned in a previous post, forums are an opportunity for local leaders from small towns in North Carolina to interact with the Governor about opportunities and challenges in community and economic development. Resource providers such as the Golden LEAF Foundation, NC Rural Center, USDA, NC Commerce, School of Government and others are on-hand to meet with participants about various resources available to support local priorities.

The following is a summary of the issues and priorities facing small towns in North Carolina that emerged during the third and final forum in Haywood County. Read More…

Governor’s Small Town Competitiveness Forum #2 — Davidson County

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

The second of three Governor’s forums on Small Town Competitiveness was held at Davidson-Davie Community College on September 28. As mentioned in a previous post, forums are an opportunity for local leaders from small towns in North Carolina to interact with the Governor about opportunities and challenges in community and economic development. Resource providers such as the Golden LEAF Foundation, NC Rural Center, USDA, NC Commerce, School of Government and others are on-hand to meet with participants about various resources available to support local priorities.

The following is a summary of the issues and priorities facing small towns in North Carolina that emerged during the second forum in Davidson County. Read More…

Governor’s Small Town Competitiveness Forum — Martin County

Will Lambe is the Director of the Community & Economic Development Program and the Community-Campus Partnership.

Governor Perdue is holding three forums on Small Town Competitiveness, the first of which was held at Martin County Community College on September 16. Details and agenda for the forums are available here. Forums are an opportunity for local leaders from small towns in North Carolina to interact with the governor directly. Resource providers such as the Golden LEAF Foundation, NC Rural Center, USDA, NC Commerce, School of Government and others are on-hand to meet with participants about various resources available to support local community and economic development.

The following is a summary of the issues and priorities facing small towns in North Carolina that emerged during the first forum in Martin County. Much of the discussion focused on hurricane clean-up and recovery following Hurricane Irene.

Celebrating ‘Common Ground’ in Kinston, NC

Kendra Cotton is a project director with the Community-Campus Partnership.

Founded in 2010, Common Ground of Eastern North Carolina, Inc. established Kinston’s first community garden in an effort to “create opportunities for youth of limited resources to engage in personal and social change through sustainable agriculture and environmental stewardship.” Located at the intersection of Laura Lane and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard on five acres of a post-Hurricane Floyd FEMA buyout flood site owned by the City of Kinston, the garden’s grand-opening/dedication ceremony will be held on Saturday, September 24 from 9am-1pm on its grounds. Read More…