The Tortoise, the Hare, and Demolition in Historic Districts

A few blocks from downtown in the town’s historic district sit two houses built [more…]

Conveyance of Local Government Property for Affordable Housing

A developer of affordable housing for low and moderate income persons has approached the [more…]

Notice and Hearing Requirements for Economic Development Appropriations

As discussed in a prior post, Session Law 2015-277 requires North Carolina local governments [more…]

Development Finance Initiative: Rebuilding North Carolina one town at a time – Southern City

This article was originally published in the November/December edition of Southern City, as “Rebuilding [more…]

The Community and Economic Development program at the School of Government provides public officials with training, research, and assistance that support local efforts to create jobs and wealth, expand the tax base, and maintain vibrant communities. We deploy the resources of the University to support the development goals of communities in North Carolina.

Recent Blog Posts |

  • Community Resilience Has Many Faces… Part 1

    The 2016 Disaster Recovery Act was signed into law in December 2016 and provides over $200 million to help recovery after Hurricane Matthew and the wildfires in western North Carolina. This appropriation is intended to cover needs not met by Federal disaster recovery funds allocated to the state in the form of grants, loans, and insurance payments, which to date total well over $400 million. Many daunting challenges lie ahead in determining the most effective way of deploying these funds. The research project on community and regional resilience at the School of Government aims to help communities think differently about how they prepare for disasters and how they can become more resilient, providing data and information that can spark realistic conversations about a community’s future.  This blog looks at some of the main elements that determine resilience and vulnerability in North Carolina’s counties.

    Read more »

  • Interim Evaluation of HUD’s Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD)

    public_housing_RAD, or the Rental Assistance Demonstration program administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), may not be as radical in its approach to preserving low-income housing as its acronym suggests, but an interim evaluation of the pilot program indicates it shows promise. Read more »

  • What @sog_ced is reading on the web: December 2016

    CED_Icon_for_TwitterThe following are articles and reports on the web that the Community and Economic Development Program at the UNC School of Government shared through social media over the past month. Follow us on twitter or facebook to receive regular updates.

    Items of interest related to CED in North Carolina:

    Op-Ed explains how IMPLAN ‪economic development impact analysis is misused. ‪http://bit.ly/2gCPrnK  Also see faculty bulletin: ‪http://unc.live/2gVAwRB 

    Durham, NC featured in CityLab article asking, can historic preservation stop gentrification before it starts? http://bit.ly/2ia9Uxm

    North Carolina programs receive federal economic development grants to help promote entrepreneurship: ‪http://bit.ly/2gugv7t 

    Charlotte Business Journal looks at the possible impact of U.S. trade policy on North Carolina exporters. ‪http://bit.ly/2hfWAGV

    NC Railroad, NCDOT to contribute to rail infrastructure to support economic development at Mebane, NC industrial park. ‪http://bit.ly/2i5kUff  Read more »

  • North Carolina Education and Workforce Development Part II: The North Carolina Community College System

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/17154731146The first post in this CED blog series on education and workforce development in North Carolina elaborated on Work Ready Communities. Part II examines opportunities for workforce development within the North Carolina Community College System.

    Improving pathways to higher education is a key component in workforce development. Businesses desire competent workers with skills and training that are able to meet workforce demands. Localities are in a unique position to facilitate the development of human capital through the support of policies and programs. As SOG Professor Jonathan Morgan points out, “Communities and regions must operate successfully on each side of the human capital equation by both stimulating the demand for skilled workers and ensuring that the supply of workers is sufficient to meet that demand. The goal is to create lots of good jobs and have great workers to fill them.”

    If you build the talent, the industry might Read more »

  • Reshaping Suburban Spaces

    There is no constant in community. Population ebbs and flows; market preferences shift; the economy fluctuates. Each community evolves. In many suburban places across North Carolina—indeed, across the U.S.—that evolution includes a move toward more density, more mixed uses, and more connected neighborhoods. Communities are grappling with questions about how these places will change. What is the local government’s role in this transition? How does a city or county encourage the redevelopment of suburban spaces? And what are the practical and political implications?

    A new School of Government report, Reshaping Suburban Spaces, considers these questions and explores how communities across North Carolina are responding. Read more »

  • Biophilic Design, Part II: Case Study

    bio1Note: This is the second of three blog posts on biophilic design, a design philosophy that seeks to incorporates nature into man-made spaces. Part 1 introduced the topic of biophilic design. This post, Part 2, discusses a case study on biophilic design. Part 3 will explore the idea of biophilic cities.

    Manassas Park Elementary School

    Manassas Park Elementary School, located in Manassas Park, Virginia, was chosen for this case study because it illustrates the many simple ways that biophilic design can be incorporated into buildings. Manassas Park Elementary features naturally lit classrooms, large windows with views of nature, and outdoor learning spaces. The architects at VMDO chose these biophilic features in an effort to create the best possible environment for children and teachers. While this case study focuses on a school environment, the biophilic design features can be applied to other building types, such as offices, stores, hospitals, and homes. Read more »

  • The Power of Partnership: The Case of the NC Commerce Park in Alamance County

    NC Commerce Park

    The Times-News, 3/22/2016

    The N.C. Commerce Park in Alamance County, North Carolina is an economic development success story that underscores how vital interlocal and regional collaboration is for community and economic development. It highlights the power of partnership and also the importance of local leaders that share a collaborative mindset.

    Read more »

  • New Report Highlights Public-Private Partnerships

    p3sThe Urban Land Institute (ULI) recently published an updated guide to Public-Private Partnerships (P3s) that introduces their varied forms, their utility to both the public and private sectors, and examples of successful P3s from around the county. The report offers insights to local government staff and elected officials as well as private development professionals looking to better understand how P3s may be used to address priorities of both parties. Read more »

  • Strengthening Resilience in North Carolina’s Communities

    Hurricane Matthew and its aftermath underscore the urgent need to find ways to encourage communities to think differently about how they prepare for disasters and how they can become more resilient. Part of this is having data and information that can spark realistic conversations about a community’s future.  Another part is having the tools to turn these conversations into concrete actions to improve long-term resilience. This is the focus of a research project on community and regional resilience underway at the School of Government in conjunction with colleagues at the University of Missouri. Read more »

  • What @sog_ced is reading on the web: November 2016

    CED_Icon_for_TwitterThe following are articles and reports on the web that the Community and Economic Development Program at the UNC School of Government shared through social media over the past month. Follow us on twitter or facebook to receive regular updates.

    Items of interest related to CED in North Carolina:

    Will the North Carolina General Assembly relax rules that restrict cities from offering “critical” broadband service in rural areas? ‪http://bit.ly/2fVgjMx 

    Kings Mountain, NC approves redevelopment plan – now eligible for CDBG demolition grants for blighted buildings: ‪http://ow.ly/UQGJ20002J8 

    Report on North Carolina’s “booming” chemical and plastics manufacturing industry: http://bit.ly/2fDTxeM

    Princeville, NC residents, flooded by Hurricanes Floyd (1999) and then Matthew in 2016, are offered FEMA assistance and buyout options: http://bit.ly/2gKokmf

    New Market Tax Credit awards include two recipients based in North Carolina: Brownfield Revitalization LLC and CAHEC. ‪http://bit.ly/2fOfh6c 

    Center for Community Progress releases report on a strategic code enforcement program for High Point, NC – coauthored by SOG faculty Chris McLaughlin and Tyler Mulligan: https://t.co/PTZbX8QJlU Read more »

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